The National Trust for Nature Conservation

The Heritage If the beauty of nature were the measure of economic wealth, Nepal would be the richest country on earth. Here several of the world's ecological zones meet, creating a landscape of extremes. The land rises from subtropical forests at near sea level to the highest mountains on earth, the Himalayan, and nourishes an immense variety of flora and fauna.

For centuries, Nepal's rugged mountain terrain isolated the land, preserving hundreds of species of animals and plants that have disappeared elsewhere on the globe. During the past few decades they have begun to disappear from Nepal as well.


The Challenge Though rich in Nature, Nepal is economically one of the poorest and least developed countries in the world. Its resources sometimes fail to provide even the most basic necessities of life for its people- and their needs place a heavy burden on the environment. Unless those needs are met, the natural heritage of Nepal may vanish from the earth, never to return.
 

The Future The goal of The National Trust for Nature Conservation is to preserve the natural heritage and in so doing, to achieve a high quality of human life. The Trust works closely with many international organizations.The problems of conservation are complex, the solutions seldom obvious. But for the sake of future generations, the problems must be solved.

 

The National Trust for Nature Conservation (NTNC) was established in 1982 by a Legislative Act as an autonomous and not-for-profit organization, mandated to work in the field of nature conservation in Nepal. For over two decades, the Trust has successfully undertaken over 200 small and large projects on nature conservation, biodiversity as well as cultural heritage protection, ecotourism, and sustainable development. The Trust’s experience over the years has shown that conservation efforts in low income economies, such as Nepal, cannot be successful, much less sustainable, unless the needs and welfare of the local people are addressed. Holistic and integrated conservation and development program with active people’s participation aimed at promoting local guardianship have been the focus of all the Trust activities.

Geographically, the Trust activities have spread from the sub-tropical plains of Chitwan, Bardia and Kanchanpur in the lowlands to the Annapurna and Manaslu region of the high Himalayas, including the trans-Himalayan region of Upper Mustang and Manang. Currently, the projects of Trust are divided into three geographical areas - the lowland, the mid-hills (Kathmandu Valley) and the high mountains. The Trust’s activities in the lowlands are based in and around the Chitwan National Park, the Bardia National Park and the Shuklaphanta Wildlife Reserve located in the central, western and far-western development regions of Nepal, through the Biodiversity Conservation Center (BCC) in Chitwan, the Bardia Conservation Program (BCP) in Bardia and the Suklaphanta Conservation Program (SCP) in Kanchanpur. Similarly, the Annapurna Conservation Area Project (ACAP), the Manaslu Conservation Area Project (MCAP) and Gaurishankar Conservation Area Project (GCAP) are three protected areas managed by the Trust in the mountain region. The Central Zoo is the only project of the Trust in Kathmandu Valley. As a new initiative, the Trust has established an Energy and Climate Change Unit to address the emerging issues of climate change through mitigation and adaptation approach and renewable energy technologies. The Trust has also started work on urban environment conservation with the Bagmati River Conservation Project.